Every Lintle Helps

Every Lintle Helps

In July 2014 Tesco announced plans to build 4,000 homes on land they no longer intend to develop into retail stores. Their plan is to either sell or lease the land to developers, or build themselves via their development wing ‘Spenhill’.

All too often new build housing is built to maximise the developer’s profit by minimising space, resulting in ‘cookie-cutter’ poor quality housing that doesn’t meet the needs of consumers in the long term. Research undertaken by the Future Homes Commission suggests that only one in four consumers would choose to buy a new build home, and lists reasons such as not enough storage space, not enough natural light, and not enough flexibility in living spaces as the household changes over time as to why this is the case.

This image explores the idea of developing a new way of buying new build housing as an alternative to the traditional ‘off plan’ approach. In addition to buying a standard proscar online buy usa plot of land, consumers would be able to purchase a series of prefabricated component spaces depending on what their requirements are. Over time, as the needs of the homeowners change, they would be able to add to the original selection of components by purchasing additional ones; a spare bedroom, a set of stairs for a first floor extension, an additional living space etc. ‘Zipper’ components would be designed to connect existing components to new ones, and ‘Controlled Expansion Zones’ would be located between the plots of land, portions of which could become available for purchase by the homeowners on the adjacent sites for future flexibility and expansion.

The result is ‘ANESCO’, a new economic solution for creating ownership, which reduces the financial risk of large mortgages on spaces that aren’t perhaps needed from the outset, allowing all additional added value generated from additional components to directly benefit the homeowner.